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Full text of "The Tattler"

THE TATTLER 

WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

1944 




WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 

1944 



"(Eurk" our teacher auh frieuo 
gratefully bebtcaie Ifjis issue 
of ilje (Eattier 



THE TATTLER 

WIILILIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief, Donald Harry '44 
Assistant Editors, Clarice Graves '44, Mary Lou Bisbee '45 
Business Manager, Frederic Healy '44 
Assistants, John Polwrek '44, Edward Sincage '44 
Alumni Editor, Donna Hobbs '44 
Exchange Editor, Marion Warner '44 
Sports Editor, Robert Algustoski '44 
Literary Editor, Eva Sanderson '45 

Joke Editor, Clifford Thayer '45 
Faculty Advisor, Louise McDermott 



CONTENTS 

Dedication 2 

Senior Class Pictures 4 

Class History 11 

Class Prophecy 12 

Class Will 14 

Class Statistics 15 

Song Hits 15 

Class of '45 16 

Class of '46 17 

Class of '47 18 

Editorials 19 

Literary 20 

School Orchestra 23 

Newspaper Staff 24 

Tattler Staff 25 

Forensic Group 26 

Pro Merito 27 

Baseball . . . 28 

Basketball 29 

Alumni Notes 30 

Autographs 32 

Advertisements 33 



A 



THE TATTLER 





ROBERT JOHN ALGUSTOSKI "Yacket" 
"They laugh that win" 
Ambition: Golf Professional 
Hobby: Scrapbook 
Noted for: Continual grin 

Activities: Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 
1, 2; Track 2; Golf 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Class Treasurer 1; Concert 1; Minstrel 2; Sports Edi- 
tor Inkspots 3, 4; Sports Editor Tattler 3, 4; Winner 
of Western Mass. Golf Tourney 3; Manager Baseball 
3; Manager Basketball 3, 4; Captain Basketball 4; 
Captain Baseball 4. 



NORMAN CLINTON BATES 

"I propose to fight this out on this line, 
if it takes all summer." 
Ambition: Army Air Corps 
Hobby: Making airplanes 
Noted for: Assistant to "Myrt" 
Activities: Glee Club 2; Victory Corp 3. 



'Bates" 



CHARLOTTE BROOKES 

"Leave no stone unturned." 
Ambition: Secretary 
Hobby: Dancing 
Noted for: Campus Capers 

Activities: Concert 1; Minstrel Show 2; Class Secretary 
2, 3, 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; Secretary and Treasurer Pro 
Merito 3; Christmas Party Committee 4; Freshmen 
Reception Committee 4; Inkspots Staff 4. 




RUTH MARION CARVER "Ruthie" 

"And seem to walk on wings and tread in air." 
Ambition: Flying 

Hobby: Collecting pictures of airplanes, military 

insignias, etc. 
Noted for: Air Mindedness 

Activities: Glee Club 1. 2. 3. 4. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



5 



ROBERTA MAE CLARK "Bert" 

"Full many a glorious morning have I seen." 
Ambition: To travel 
Hobby: Collecting souvenirs 
Noted for: Humor 

Activities: Exchange Editor Inkspots 4; Victory 
Corp 3, 4. 



MARTHA DEANE 

"Her voice was ever soft 

Gentle, and low, — an excellent thing in woman." 

Ambition: Teacher 

Hobby: Stamps and snapshots 

Noted for: Sweetness 

Activities: Glee Club 3, 4; Assistant Alumni Editor 
Inkspots 3; Alumni Editor Inspots 4. 



RENE ARMAND DESMARAIS 

"Silence is the best resolve for him 
who trusts himself." 
Ambition: U. S. Marines 

Hobby: Hunting, fishing, and other sports 
Noted for: Girls 



PHYLLIS MAY GRANGER "Phil" 

"Happy am I; from care I'm free." 

Ambition: To make someone happy 
Hobby : Dancing 
Noted for: Chattering 

Activities: Glee Club 1, 2; Inkspots Staff 4; Forensic 
3; Concert 1; Minstrel 2. 







6 



THE TATTLER 




\ 



CLARICE RUTH GRAVES 

"She that was ever fair and never proud, 
Had tongue at will, and yet was never loud." 

Ambition: Success 

Hobby: Skating 

Noted for: Silver Wings 

Activities: Quarterly Staff 1; Concert 1; Glee Club 1, 
2, 3, 4; Basketball 2; Class Treasurer 2, 3; Tattler 
Staff 4; Editor of Inkspots 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; Student 
Council 3. 



DONALD WALLACE HARRY "Don" 
"Wise to resolve, and patient to perform." 
Ambition: To be an Aeronautical Engineer 
Hobbies: Skating, Skiing, Aviation 
Noted for: Executive Ability 

Activities: Forensic 2, 3, 4; President of Class 2, 3, 4; 
Student Council 2; Baseball 2, 3, 4; Victory Corps 3; 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Student Congress at South Hadley- 
Springfield; Editor of Tattler 4. 



FREDERIC CLARK HEALY, JR. "Fred" 

"Talent is that which is in a man's power." 

Ambition: To fly my own plane 
Hobby: Music 

Noted for: Likeness to Harry James 
Activities: Basketball 3, 4; Baseball 3, 4; Inkspots 3; 
Manager Tattler 3; Glee Club 3, 4; Orchestra 4. 



DONNA ELAINE HOBBS 

"Speak gently; 'tis a little thing." 
Ambition: Social Worker 
Hobby: Reading 
Noted for: Note writing 

Activities: Basketball 2; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Minstrel 
Show 2; Inkspots 3, 4; Cheerleader 2, 3; Tattler 4. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



7 



AGNES H. MATRISHON "Aggie" 
"We are swinging round the circle." 
Hobby : Dancing 
Noted for: Dancing 

Activities: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Pro Merito 3, 4; Concert 
2; Minstrel 1. 



JAMES FRANCIS McALLISTER, JR. "Mac" 

"No man is happy who does not think himself so." 

Ambition: Automobile Expert 
Hobbies: Hunting and Fishing 
Noted for: Trips up South St. 

Activities: Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; Soccer 
2, Glee Club 2. 



RUTH ELEANOR MUNSON "Tootie" 

"All I ask is to be let alone." 

Ambition: Nurse 

Hobby: Stamp Collecting 

Noted for: Sophistication 

Activities: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert 1; Debating 4; 
Pro Merito 3, 4; Vice-President Pro Merito 3; Original 
Declamation 4; Assistant Literary Editor Tattler 4. 



HARLAN WAYNE NYE "Herb" 
"For I am nothing if not critical." 
Ambition: To participate in the rebuilding of Germany 
Hobbies: Model gliders and Chemistry 
Noted for: Talking 

Activities: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Student Congress at 
South Hadley and Springfield 4; Assistant Editor of 
Sports 3; Manager of Baseball 2; Debating 4. 




8 



THE TATTLER 





MERTON EUGENE NYE "Myrt" 

"Many things difficult to design prove easy 
t6 performance." 
Ambition: Farmer 
Hobby: Play accordian 
Noted for: Lab Creations 

Activities: Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Victory Corps 3. 



JOHN JAMES POLWREK "Sonny" 
"A good man possesses a kingdom." 
Ambition: To be successful 
Hobby : Sports 
Noted for: Smooth Clothes 

Activities: Soccer 1; Class Vice-President 2, 3, 4; Base- 
ball 2, 3, 4; Basketball 2, 3, 4; President Pro Merito 
3, 4; Sports Editor Tattler 3; Assistant Business Man- 
ager Tattler 4; Student Congress at South Hadley 
and A. I. C. 4. 



MARGARET ELLEN RYAN "Mickey" 
"Life let us cherish, while yet the tapers glows." 
Ambition: To travel 

Hobbies : Dancing, swimming and ice skating 
Noted for: Admiration for sailors 

Activities: Class Historian 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball 1, 2; Pro Merito 4; Concert 1; Minstrel 2. 



EDWARD WILLIAM SINCAGE, JR. "Bud" 
"None but himself can be his parallel." 
Ambition: To be a good golfer 
Hobby: Golf 
Noted for: Noise 

Activities: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Soccer 2; Golf 1, 3, 4; 
Assistant Business Manager Tattler 4; Minstrel 2; 
Manager of Inkspots 4; Concert 1. 




WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



9 



JUSTIN B. STONE 

"So ends the bloody business of the day." 
Noted for: Woman hating 
Activities: Glee Club 1; Victory Corps 3. 




MARION ELEANOR SYLVESTER 

She doeth little kindnesses 

Which most leave undone or despise." 

Ambition : Secretary 
Hobby: "Packards" 
Noted for: Bright remarks 

Activities: Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Concert 1; Pro Merito 
4; Cheer Leaders 3; Circulation Editor Inkspots 4; 
Freshmen Reception Committee 4. 




MARION EDITH WARNER 

"Oh, Marion, go and call the cattle home." 
Ambition: To travel 

Hobby: Square dancing and swimming 
Noted for: Arguments 

Activities: Concert 1; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; Class Treas- 
urer 1, 4; Inkspots Staff 4; Exchange Editor Tattler 4. 




10 



THE TATTLER 



SENIOR CLASS 


OFFICERS 


PRESIDENT 


Donald Harry 


VICE-PRESIDENT 


John Polwrek 


SECRETARY 


Charlotte Brookes 


TREASURER 


Marion Warner 


CLASS HISTORIAN 


Margaret Ryan 


GRADUATION 


NIGHT 


CLASS HISTORY 


Clarice Graves 


CLASS PROPHECY 


Marion Sylvester 


CLASS WILL 


John Pol A-rek 


GRADUATION NIGHT ORATIONS 


America Our Heritage 


Charlotte Brookes 


America Our Home 


Margaret Ryan 


America Our Future 


Ruth Munson 


America Our Challenge 


Donald Han-y 


CLASS MOTTO 


Today Decides Tomorrow 


COLORS 




CLASS GIFT 




SENIOR CLASS 


Robert Algustoski 


Donna Hobbs 


Norman Bates 


Agnes Matrishon 


Charlotte Brookes 


James McAllister 


Ruth Carver 


Ruth Munson 


Roberta Clark 


Harlan Nye 


Martha Deane 


Merton Nye 


Rene Desmarais 


John Polwrek 


Phyllis Granger 


Margaret Ryan 


Clarice Graves 


Edward Sincage 


Donald Harry 


Justin Stone 


Frederic Healy 


Marion Sylvester 




Marion Warner 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



11 



Class History 



September 3, 1941, was the first day of 
high school for about 35 laughing- fresh- 
men. On this day we stayed only a short 
while but we were assigned to our home 
room, made out our schedules and met our 
faculty advisor, Mr. Mulally who was also 
new that year. 

Our first class meeting was held a few 
weeks later when we elected our class of- 
ficers which were: 

President — George Packard 

Vice-President — Robert Morin 

Secretary — Robert Toski 

Treasurer — Marion Warner 

Historian — Margaret Ryan 

We soon began to hear rumors of Fresh- 
men Reception and how we were to be ini- 
tiated. For several lunch hours before the 
dreaded day we found ourselves taken by 
the Seniors to the lunch room where they 
tried to teach us to dance. These jam ses- 
sions didn't prove too successful but some 
of us learned a little as to what dancing 
was all about. 

The upperclassmen did a great deal of 
talking, but when the reception was held we 
found to our surprise and relief there was 
to be no initiation due to the conduct in 
previous years. We all enjoyed ourselves 
very much. 

During the remainder of the year we 
found some of our classmates going out for 
sports, showing their enthusiasm which 
later led to stardom at Burgy High. 

We returned and found we had lost many 
members from the past year but a few 
new faces joined us. 

That year we elected as our class officers: 
President — Donald Harry 
Vice-President — John Polwrek 
Secretary — Charlotte Brooks 
Treasurer — Clarice Graves 
Historian — Margaret Ryan 

Our faculty advisor, Miss Barrus, was a 
new teacher this year but she became ac- 
quainted with us very soon and Room Two 



was always a home room bursting with 
laughter. 

Again both our boys and girls showed 
good work in sports and we saw many of 
our classmates playing on the first teams. 

In our Sophomore year we put on our first 
entertainment. It was a Thanksgiving Party 
at which we made a little money to start 
our treasury and at which we all enjoyed 
ourselves. 

Our junior year found us back with only 
23 of the number we started with in 1941. 
That year we elected our class officers as 
follows: 

President — Donald Harry 

Vice-President — John Polwrek 

Secretary — Charlotte Brooks 

Treasurer — Clarice Graves 

Historian — Margaret Ryan 

During this year we found the names of 
our classmates high in the lights of fame at 
Burgy High. The Toski brothers worked 
as a great team in basketball while Bob 
Toski brought the name of Burgy High 
to the top in a different field, that of golf. 
Some members of our class won honors 
through the Forensic League. The Pro 
Merito list was announced by Miss Dunphy 
and we found six of us were honor students 
at the end of our two years. 

Because of the war and transportation 
difficulties we decided not to try to put on a 
Prom, but we did give a Valentine Party 
which was another success. 

In the fall of 1943, we returned and took 
our seats in the Senior room with pride. We 
elected the following officers: 

President — Donald Harry 
Vice-President — John Polwrek 
Secretary— Charlotte Brooks 
Treasurer — Marion Warner 

Historian — Margaret Ryan 

Shortly after starting school Tommy 
Toski left us to join the Navy. We were 
proud yet sorry to see him go and we hope 
that he, as all the other boys, will be back 
with us again soon. 



12 



THE TATTLER 



This year we put on Freshman Recep- 
tion, the honor we had been looking forward 
to for four years. Since we had not been 
initiated in our freshman year we had no 
feeling of revenge so we gave the Fresh- 
men an enjoyable evening. 

Later we put on the annual Christmas 
Party. As we needed to increase our treas- 
ury this spring, we sponsored two square 
dances, one in Williamsburg, and one in 
Goshen, and we also put on a successful 
Food Sale. 

Again this year many of our class won 



honors in the field of sports and in the 
Forensic League. Donald Harry was pre- 
sented a degree of honor and Ruth Munson 
received a degree of merit for their good 
work in debating. In May, Miss Dunphy an- 
nounced the honor students. There were two 
high honor and five honor students. 

And now June has come and we are about 
to receive our diplomas. As we look back 
over the four years we find they hold many 
pleasant memories for each of us, and 
days that will never be forgotten. 

CLARICE GRAVES. 



Class Prophecy 

This is the year 1959, and I have just finished reading an interesting letter from 
a Burgy High classmate, CLARICE GRAVES. She wrote as follows: 



Williamsburg, Mass. 
May 18. 1959. 

Dear Marion: 

I thought I would drop you a line as I 
have just returned from China as a mis- 
sionary. 

On my way home, I stopped in New York. 
While sitting in my room at the hotel, won- 
dering what to do that evening, I noticed 
in the paper that there was going to be a 
piano and violin recital at Radio City 
Musical Hall. Being a lover of good music, 
I reserved a seat for the concert, and when 
the artists were announced as DONNA 
HOBBS and JAMES McALLISTER, I 
couldn't believe my ears; but then I saw 
them and knew it was our old classmates. 
Their playing was wonderful! 

After the recital I went back stage to see 
Donna and Jimmy, who told me that FRED 
HEALY and EDWARD SINCAGE had their 
own bands now, and were both playing 
there in New York in two elite night-clubs. 

We were just going to look them up when 
we heard voices talking and laughing, and 
people hurrying down the hall. When I 
looked out to see who it was, I saw to my 
surprise CHARLOTTE BROOKES, MAR- 
GARET RYAN, and ROBERTA CLARK. 



Just then MERTON NYE came storming 
down the hall and told the girls to get 
going! He said they were dancers, and had 
joined the "Rockettes," and were heading 
for the top, and he was their manager. I 
wished them luck and stayed to the show, 
which was very good. 

The next day I went to the first baseball 
game of the season, in which the New York 
Yankees were playing the Boston Red Sox. 
As I was sitting there waiting for the game 
to start, I saw none other than JUSTIN 
STONE walking aimlessly along calling 
"peanuts — popcorn." I bought some peanuts 
from him and we sat and talked for a while. 

The game started when the mayor threw 
the ball out into the field, I thought I rec- 
ognized him, but not being sure I asked 
Justin what his name was. He said, "Oh, 
didn't you know— that's DONALD HARRY, 
the president of our class in Burgy High!" 
I was of course surprised, but I always knew 
that he would make good. 

As the umpire announced the players, I 
was astonished at the pitcher's name, 
ROBERT TOSKI. Wondering if it could be 
my classmate, I got out my field glasses 
and sure enough it was he. I could tell that 
grin a mile away. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



13 



While watching the game I heard a fam- 
iliar voice yelling "Murder 'de Bums." I 
looked up in the press box, and I saw 
NORMAN BATES practically tearing his 
hair out, and writing furiously. I saw him 
later, and he said he was a reporter for 
the sports column in the New York Times. 

After the game I took a taxi back to my 
hotel. While sitting in the back seat, I no- 
ticed the picture and name of the cab 
driver. Yes, it was RUTH CARVER. She 
didn't recognize me until I spoke to her; 
then she drove me around New York City, 
and told me what she had been doing since 
she left Burgy. I asked her if she knew 
the whereabouts of any of our other old 
classmates. She said that PHYLLIS 
GRANGER was the head of the English 
department at Vassar. I certainly was as- 
tonished at that, remembering how Phyl 
hated English in Burgy. And also that 
MARTHA DEANE was a Senator from 
Massachusetts. Remembering that she had 
good ideas in school, I was not surprised 
that she was in politics. 

When I got to the hotel I noticed a 
large crowd had gathered, and someone 
told me there had been an accident. Then 
I heard a deep voice say, "Give the man 
air." I looked to see who had spoken and I 
saw a tall, good-looking doctor standing 
there. I looked again to make sure, and 
yes, it was RENE DESMARAIS. He and 
his nurse, RUTH MUNSON, were trying to 
move the patient into the ambulance. I 
talked to them for a few minutes, but they 
had to hurry to the hospital. 

After all the excitement, I started into 
the hotel, and whom should I bump into but 
MA7J0N WARNER. I was glad to see her. 



and asked her where she was going in such 
a rush. She was of course married, and said 
she and her husband had a dairy farm on 
the outskirts of New York, and that she was 
delivering milk to all the apartments. She 
gave me a quart and it certainly was Grade 
A. I just laughed, and then she asked me 
if I knew HARLAN NYE was running for 
governor on the Democratic ticket. I said, 
"No," and was very much surprised. She 
told me that he said the Democrats just 
couldn't get along without so great a leader. 
We started talking about the fun we had 
in high school, and when I finally reached 
my room, I was really tired. 

The next day, which was the day I was 
leaving for Burgy, I had about half an hour 
before my train left, and I decided to ex- 
change a dress I had bought at Altman's. 
So I went in and asked to see the manager. 
They led me to his office and I walked in, 
and there sitting behind the desk, smoking 
a cigar, was JOHN POLWREK. He called 
in a clerk who exchanged my dress, and 
while I was waiting, who should walk in 
but AGNES MATRISHON, a model at 
John's store. She wanted the next day off 
as she had a very important engagement. 
After she left he told me that she was a 
very good model, but it was hard to keep 
her. I said good-bye to John, as I had to 
hurry to catch my train. 

Well, I'm back in Burgy now. Although 
this is a long letter, I hope it will bring 
back memories of your old pals in high 
school. Write me soon, and tell me all about 
your new job as head of the Geometry de- 
partment at Burgy High. 

As ever. 

CLARICE. 



14 



THE TATTLER 



Class Will 

On this twenty-second day of June A. D. 1944, the Senior Class of Williamsburg High 
School, Williamsburg, Massachusetts, signed the foregoing instrument in our presence, 
declaring it to be their last Will, and as witnesses thereof, we three do now, at their 
request, in their presence, and in the presence of each other, hereto subscribe our names. 

MAIRZY DOATS, DOZY DOATS, LITTLE LAMZY DIVEY. 



Be it remembered that we, the senior 
class, of Williamsburg, in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, being of sound 
mind and memory, but knowing the uncer- 
tainty of this life, do make this our last 
Will and Testament. 

After the payment of our just debts and 
other charges, we bequeath and devise as 
follows: 

To Mr. Merritt we leave an extra shoe 
ration stamp so that he may continue his 
most excellent square dancing. 

To Miss Dunphy we leave a forty-eight 
hour clock so that she will have time to ac- 
complish all that she must do in one day. 

As a special bequest we wish to leave to 
Miss McDermott our since thanks and best 
wishes for being our ideal of a class advisor. 

To Miss Webber we leave a sound-proof 
classroom so that her classes will not be 
interrupted by the weird sounds coming 
from the assembly hall. 

Mr. Foster is left a new set of tires and 
a C ration stamp to enable him to take 
next year's Biology class on their field trip. 

To Mrs. Smith we leave an electrically 
controlled robot speaker in case she ever 
loses her voice again. 

Robert Algustoski wishes to leave his 
sports ability to anyone who thinks he can 
fill his shoes. 

Martha Deane leaves her quiz-kid intelli- 
gence in Bookkeeping to Tux Thayer. 

To Eugene Shay, Agnes Matrishon leaves 
her dancing ability. 

Merton Nye leaves his lab creations to 
Jack Belck. (Note the Lab is still standing. 
Please try to leave it so.) 

Rene Desmarais wills his "way with 
women" to Bobby Smart. 

Margaret Ryan bequeaths her collection 
of V-mail letters to the School Library. 

To Yolanda Cunningham, Marion Warner 
leaves her interest in farming. 



Clarice Graves leaves her silver wings 
to any aspiring Junior. 

Marion Sylvester wills her place in Pack- 
ard's to anyone who thinks he can spend 
as much time there as she has. 

Donna Hobbs wishes to leave her interest 
in the Navy to Ruth Bowker. 

James McAllister leaves the two front 
seats in the Loge of the Calvin to Barry 
Purrington and Elizabeth Yates. 

Harlan Nye and Edward Sincage will their 
arguments to any two students in next 
year's P.D. Class who want to start a riot. 

Frederic Healy leaves his trumpet to 
Roger LaCourse. Fred hopes that Roger 
will make as good use of it as he has. 

Ruth Munson wishes to have her place as 
an honor student filled by Peter Crone. 

Norman Bates leaves his interest in a 
certain Haydenville girl to Walter Demerski. 

Justin Stone wills his English IV naps 
to Felix Brisbois. 

To Stewart Chapin, Donald Harry leaves 
his dependability. 

Phyllis Granger leaves her fits of giggling 
during class to Betty Brooks. 

Roberta Clark wills her driving license 
to anyone who likes to take corners on two 
wheels. 

Charlotte Brookes leaves with regret her 
Saturday night trips to Ashfield to Hattie 
Clark because we know she will appreciate 
them. 

To Janet Hillenbrand, Ruth Carver leaves 
her ability to arrive at school at 8 o'clock. 

We bequeath to the Class of '45 our posi- 
tion as seniors and with it, the doubtful 
pleasure of taking English IV. 

We nominate and appoint Bernard Cross 
sole Executor of this, our last Will and 
Testament; hereby revoking all other Wills 
and Codicils by us heretofore made. 

THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1944. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



15 



Class Statistics 



Prpftip<;t fiirl 


• • viaiiLt. uiavcs 


Handsomest Boy . 


. . Rene Desmarais 


Most Popular Girl 


. . . Marion Warner 


Most Popular Boy 


. . Robert Algustoski 


Best Girl Dancer 


. . . Marion Warner 


Best Boy Dancer . 


. . . Donald Harry 


Best Dressed Girls 


. . . Donna Hobbs 




and Clarice Graves 


Best Dressed Boy 


. . . . John Polwrek 


Noisiest Student 


. . Edward Sincage 


Quietest Student . 


. . . Martha Deane 


Smartest Student . 


. . . Donald Harry 


Best Girl Athlete . 


, . . . Donna Hobbs 


Best Boy Athlete 


. , . Robert Algustoski 


Best Ail-Round Student . . Donald Harry 












Son 


Fred Healy and Don Harry . "Mairzy Doats" 


Miss Johnson . . 


. . "Marines Hymn" 




"Daddy" 


Miss McDermott 


. "He Wears A Pair of 




Silver Wings" 




. . . "Quiet Please" 


Miss Webber . . 


. . "Take It Easy" 




. . . . "Lazy Bones" 


Ruth Munson . . 


"Don't Sweetheart Me" 


Charlotte Brookes 


. . "2 O'Clock Jump" 



Class Musician .... Frederic Healy 

Cutest Girl Agnes Matrishon 

Cutest Boy Robert Algustoski 

Class Gossip .... James McAllister 

Student Most Likely 

to Succeed Ruth Munson 

Student with Most Pleasing 

Personality .... Clarice Graves 

Class Wit Roberta Clark 

Most Bashful Frederic Healy 

Most Sophisticated . . . Ruth Munson 

Favorite Sport Basketball 

Favorite Subject Bookkeeping 

Favorite Actors . . . Humphrey Bogart 

and John Payne 

Favorite Actress .... Greer Garson 

Favorite Orchestra .... Harry James 

Hits 

Marion Sylvester . . "I Had the Craziest 

Dream" 

Clarice Graves .... 'Til Be Around" 

Edward Sincage 'Hot Lips" 

Marion Warner . "The Farmer in the Dell" 

Harlan Nye . . . "Der Feurher's Face" 

Junior Prom . . "What a Lovely Way to 

Spend an Evening" 

Junior Class . . . "11 More Months and 

10 More Days" 

Bob Toski .... "Take Me Out to the 

Ball Game" 



16 



THE TATTLER 



Class of 1945 




First Row: Rita Lupien, Mary Lou Bisbee, Lorraine Jones, Barry Purrington, Eva 
Sanderson, Louise Newell. 

Second Row: Beverly Cole, Betty Batura, Ruth LaCasse, Ruth Bean, Ruth Mollison, 
Phyllis Rhoades. 

Third Row: Bernard Cross, Clifford Thayer, Felix Brisbois, Clarence LaPointe, Neil 
Damon, Norman Hathaway. 



* * * * 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT, Barry Purington SECRETARY, Lorraine Jones 

VICE-PRESIDENT, Mary Lou Bisbee TREASURER, Eva Sanderson 

CLASS HISTORIAN. Louise Newell 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



17 



Class of 1946 




First Row: Alice Golash, Shirley Hathaway, Richard Daniels, Morris Healy, Robert 
Lesure, Hattie Clark. 

Second Row: Esther Golash, Bette Kulash, Barbara Cone, Ruth Bowker, Malvina 
Brisbois, Helen Sylvester, Theodora Harlow. 

Third Row: Robert Dana, Marshall Warner, Edward Lezynski, Russell Loomis, Sue 
Crone, Lawrence Packard. 

* * * 



CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT, Morris Healy VICE-PRESIDENT, Richard Daniels 

SECRETARY, Robert Lesure TREASURER, Richard Daniels 

CLASS HISTORIAN, Shirley Hathaway 



18 



THE TATTLER 



Class of 1947 




■ m 



First Row: Barbara Dymerski, Rose Swinington, Shirley Payne, Peter Crone, Doris 
Graves, Donald Bates, Alec Cochrane, Elizabeth Yates, Helen Clark. 

Second Row: Janet Hillenbrand, Rowena Nye, Yolanda Cunningham, Elizabeth Brooks, 
Georgene Harry, Ethel Church, Harriet Ice, Bernice Miller, Rosalie Ice. 

Third Row: Eugene Shay, Stewart Chapin, Walter Demerski, Floyd Merritt, David 
LeDuc, Walter Nye, Robert Smart. 

Fourth Row: John Belk, Paul Brisbois, Robert Smith, Frederick Oliver, George 
Ferron, Leland Bates. 



* * * 



CLASS OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT, Doris Graves SECRETARY, Peter Crone 

VICE-PRESIDENT, Donald Bates TREASURER, Alec Cochrane 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



19 



Editorial 



TODAY DECIDES TOMORROW 

Today, as we look back on the years 
which have preceded, we say to ourselves, 
"Couldn't all this have been prevented?" 
We see Baldwin, Chamberlain, Daladier; we 
think of Munich, Czechoslovakia and many 
others. We wonder at the really insigni- 
ficant quarrels and prejudices which began 
this terrible conflict and then wonder. "Is 
it really worth it?" 

Today, the answers to these questions are 
being debated and argued in homes, town 
halls, elections, state departments and by 
nation's leaders. There have been many and 
varied views, but the real cause and the 
lessons we must learn came from the last 
peace table. The last peace was a weak 
one, doomed to failure. The Versailles 
Treaty was a revengeful, uncompromising 
pie?e of European politics if there ever was 
one, and the League of Nations being a 
weak organization failed because of the 
spirit with which the three important na- 
tions joined it. 



Today, we find ourselves scarificing, fight- 
ing, and draining God-given natural re- 
sources to repair the wrongs and mistakes 
which we have made in the past. Certainly, 
it stands to reason that if this slaughter 
and revenge should carry into another 
clash in twenty-five years the road ahead 
would be strewn with many obstacles. As 
John Paul Jones said, "We have not yet 
begun to fight." For to win the peace in 
a manner which will win the war and yet 
not hinder world progress is one thing. To 
"win" a peace which will only break down 
in a short time is another. It is up to us. 
We should know enough about world affairs 
so that we are not duped by an idea that 
sounds good but is not practical. In our 
schools of today we have discussed these 
questions. The boys overseas know what 
they are fighting for. We, of the younger 
generation are headed in the right direc- 
tion. Let's keep on that road to a life that 
is clean, worth living and free from this 
useless destruction. 

DONALD HARRY '44. 



% He He 



AMERICA TOMORROW 

We of today are the individuals who will 
decide what America is to be tomorrow. 
We want a world without war, without 
bombing, without destruction of any kind. 
To promote permanent peace, we must first 
put all we have into winning this war. 

We of today do not want to raise our 
children for war, to have them kill and 
be killed. We want to bring them up to 
think of peace, and to be friendly with the 
other nations in the world. 

The American people have produced for 
themselves a standard of living at least 
twice as high as that of any other people. 
This progress has grown out of our individ- 
ual freedom. We have built it out of our 
own genius and our own resources. 



If the coming years are to see advances 
in the ways of living people, education must 
be made world-wide. Disease, suffering, and 
poverty, will a?cordingly be reduced be- 
cause of this, and comfort and the good 
things of life will be increased and spread. 

The boys who have gone "over there" 
want a chance to make an honest living 
when they come back. They do not want to 
come back to a country that is disagreeing 
and uncertain within itself. 

It is up to us — the youth of the nation 
to see that this peace will be permanent 
and that our children and children of all 
races have the opportunity to grow up in 
a world of tranquility. 

MARION WARNER '44 



20 



THE TATTLER 



Literary 



MARINE HYMN 

Today as you walk down the Main street 
of your town wherever you may be you 
find signs all over the street — signs ask- 
ing you how many bonds you have bought 
this week, and whether you really need 
that ice cream soda you were about to buy. 
Or you'll see posters asking you if you can 
join the Army, Navy, Marines, Coast Guard, 
not forgetting the Air Corps. You have 
read these signs before and so you go 
on your way not paying much attention. 
You go past the town square and there on 
the lawn by the old Civil War and World 
War guns you see the town honor roll with 
the names of all the boys who are serving 
their country. This does not attract your 
attention either now, but when it was put up 
you read every name and beside the names 
of four you found a gold star whi?h meant 
that they had died for their country. 

You decide that the soda can wait be- 
cause you see by your watch that it will 
be time for the train in five minutes, just 
time enough to get to the station. 

Before you know it you are at the station. 
The train is coming in and then you see him. 
Pride lights your eyes as you see your son 
walk toward you in the uniform of the 
United States Marines. This is the first time 
you have seen him in uniform and he looks 
splendid. 

The days pass swiftly and now he must 
go back. The good-bye at the train and the 
long walk home are here again. As you walk 
home suddenly everything comes alive espe- 
cially the honor roll and the four gold stars. 
You read the names over again, this time 
very slowly. You read slowly thinking of the 
man or boy whose name that is. All the 
restlessness is suddenly gone, .you know 
what you are going to do now, nothing can 
stop you, so you walk down the rest of the 
street with your head held high and your 
steps light. Again you pass the Army, 
Navy, Coast Guard and Air Corps posters. 
At the last one you turn, push open the 
large glass door and walk down the long 
corridor till you come to the sign that says 
"Women enlist here." You stop a minute to 



think of what you are about to do. In the 
next minute you are answering questions 
for a lady marine. 

You leave the building to wait for your 
orders to return again to be sworn in. 
That day comes and you find yourself and 
three others being sworn into the United 
States Marines. Then you are put on a 
train and headed for basic training at 
Camp Lejeune, New River, N. C. 

Two weeks pass, ten, twelve, and then 
you are commissioned a lieutenant. 

You go back to the day you enlisted and 
look at the reason. The reason was the 
honor roll and the four gold stars. One of 
those stars stood for your oldest son who 
was killed in the South Pacific. Remember 
how when the news came his brother, your 
second son, had enlisted? Yes, you and the 
only man in the family left, are all carry- 
ing on the fight in the Marines. 

DORIS GRAVES '47 



A PICTURE REVEALS MEMORIES 

Somewhere along the twisted jungle front 
in a muddy and narrow fox hole crouches a 
tired and weary soldier. It is nearing dusk 
and the quiet tropical sun is sinking 
beneath the blue and red horizon. After a 
fierce and sudden struggle during which the 
glowing red sky resembled the fiercing red 
glow of fire on the battlefield, a soldier lies 
tense and weary. He has a soldier's feeling 
of companionship for his buddies who have 
left him in their glory of death in a recent 
struggle. For the first time has a feeling of 
true thoughts and emotions which seem to 
stir in his heart as he thinks of their recent 
u'eath in that last battle. 

He wants to cry but his mind changes 
to a frenzy of rage as his thoughts keep 
wandering back to that struggle. As the 
night creeps in, he begins to grow tired 
and cares little what future actions have in 
store for him. Taking off his helmet, he 
gazes at a faded and torn picture which 
takes him back to his childhood days with 
his buddies. Included in that pi?ture were 
four of his closest pals — Ed, Tim, Bill, 
and Sam. Those guys were only between 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



21 



the ages of six and eight at the time the 
picture was taken. They were only kids 
who never had a worry or a care for 
anything but fun. Their fun and happiness 
and safety have been erased by the holocast 
of war; their smiles in that picture have 
been erased by the constant fear of death 
and the grim future which they had to face. 
Gazing at the picture he remembers the 
childhood times they had together, still 
remembering that spring day when they 
had all scampered out on the front lawn to 
have their pictures taken. That picture would 
reveal memories of days which they would 
never see again. Memories which he is the 
last to remember — those memories which 
would take all the warm feeling in his heart 
and let it fade away in the smoke of battle 
whi:h had taken his closest buddies to a 
soldier's death in heaven. As he started to 
doze off in a restless sleep he began to mur- 
mur words to himself. "Good ol' Ed — he was 
a swell guy, and Tim, just a kid, and Bill 
who's left his wife and young son, Sam 



who wanted to be a pilot but couldn't make 
it. I only hope I can be back some day and 
tell the folks how those boys died for their 
sweethearts and friends. I hope that those 
people back home are working and praying 
the very utmost to help us win this blasted 
war and go back to the place we love 
most — "home". As I gaze at this picture, I 
know for the first time how a tender feel- 
ing of warmth and friendship can enter a 
fellow's heart for his closest friends; and a 
picture which brought back to me the me- 
mories of my childhood days and my closest 
buddies who had shared those times with 
me. May this picture serve as a true token 
of the swellest guys I ever knew." 

He slumped forward, his helmet grasped 
in his hand and his head bent toward the 
earth in a state of reverence as he quietly 
murmured himself to a long sleep under the 
rising shadows of darkness as the tropical 
moon beamed a golden light upon his face. 

ROBERT TOSKI '44. 



* * * 



"OUR FAMILY CAR" 

Sitting in our garage now, is a very fussy 
and temperamental creature — our car. She 
seems almost human. When someone needs 
her in a hurry. She does not start. When we 
go joy riding, however, we never have any 
trouble with her. 

She lords it over us, because I think she 
realizes how much we depend on her, living 
as far from civilization as we do. 

Each of her fenders is adorned with a 
scratch or a nick put there by some driver 
or other. Once a month she gets a good 
cleaning, which she needs badly, after piav- 
ing in puddles and mud as she does. Her 
vpholstery is also gone over, and some of 
the dirt and sand is shoveled out. 

In winter, when the temperature is 
twenty-four or so, everyone freezes. The 
heater runs with a great deal of assorted 



noises but no heat comes out. 

Her habits are many and usually annoy- 
ing. She has a habit of stopping in the 
middle of a hill. After pushing the starter 
for awhile, she starts and goes on her merry 
way as if nothing had happened. Another 
habit of hers is to have her clutch stick. 
When the driver shifts there comes a hor- 
rible grinding and then she stops. 

Sometimes she handles smoothly, other 
times she doesn't. In winter you have to use 
both hands to shift gears, and a superhuman 
effort is needed to push down the peddles. 
Once in awhile there is a short circuit 
somewhere and her horn blows 'till the 
battery wears out. 

All in all she is a good car. Everybody 
loves her in spite of her manners. 

She may be impertinent and stubborn but 
she's got a new tire. 

JOHN BELK '47 



22 



THE TATTLER 



A GOOD MAN 

There was a kindly man who used 
To walk the village street, 
Whcm everybody in the town 
Was always glad to meet. 

With pleasant words and cheery lace 
He greeted man and child, 
And they were happier because 
He spoke to them and smiled. 

If he had troubles, no one knew. 
He did not let them dim 
His sight for seeing lovely things. 
Why can't we be like him? 

MARGARET RYAN '44. 



WEATHER 

In spring I 'spose we need the rain 
To make our flowers grow, 
But why, oh why, when we've got things 
planned 

Does it have to start to snow? 

First, it's hot and then it's cold. 
I don't see how anything grows. 
Rubbers and raincoats, scarves and boots 
Not to mention a stuffed up nose. 

I think it's best to stay in the house. 
It's warm and safe in there. 
With no wet puddles to soak your feet 
And no wind to muss up your hair. 

DONNA HOBBS '44. 



SPRING 

It's happened again as it always will, 
The wind's in the south and the tree on 
the hill 

Bends in the breeze and shakes its limbs 
As if to awaken all sleeping things. 
The sun is high, and the sky is blue. 
The west is radiant and there are pink 

clouds too. 
Awaken 'tis spring! 
It's no time for rest, 
For it is the birthday of our harvest. 

GEORGENE HARRY '47. 



THE SEASONS 

The leaves are falling, oh so fast, 

The birds have ceased their song at last. 

The wintry winds are on their way, 
Long is the night and short the day. 

The snow is gently falling now, 
Covering field and forest bough. 

The aurora borealis bright 

Sends forth its beauty in wonderous light. 

Soon will come the spring again, 
Bringing with it flowers and rain. 

Then summer with its balmy breeze 
Will bring new life to all the trees. 

Each season has its glad refrain, 
And in its turn brings joy again, 

While as the years go on their way 
There's something new in every day. 

SHIRLEY PAYNE '47. 



THE LONE RANGER 

He galloped 'cross the country 

after an Injun' Chief, 
And as he shifted into high 

he shouted "Stop, you thief!" 
He chased the fleeing Injun across the 

valley floor — the low-down ornery 
Injun' who stole his Ration Book 4. 

The Ranger's nag had a blowout, but 

the old mare galloped still. 
And soon enough — 'twas almost noon, 

He closed in for the kill. 
The Injun' screamed in terror as he 

urged his old nag on — 
The Ranger pumped six slugs at him, 

and then his shots were gone. 

So he took out his slingshot 

and, killed the Injun' dead — 
And 'cause the Injun' had more stamps 

he took his book instead. 
But now he's in the cooler for twenty 

years and a day. 
'Cause when he rode back into town 

he was nabbed by the O.P.A. 

BEVERLY COLE '45. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



School Orchestra 




Seated: Mary Lou Bisbee, Morris Healy, Frederic Healy, Edward Sincage. 
Standing: Floyd Merritt, Robert Lesure, Eva Sanderson, Doris Graves, Clifford Thayer. 



* * * 

Through the combined efforts of our 
music instructor, Miss Healy, the school 
faculty and committee, we have been able 
to organize a school orchestra. 

The organization was started about the 
middle of the year at which time we held a 
business meeting. Since then weekly re- 
hearsals have been held. 

The first appearance of the orchestra was 
April 26 at the school during a musical 
prgoram. At this time the music was greatly 
praised. The orchestra also played at a 
meeting of the Williamsburg Grange. 

The only reason for the success of the 
orchestra has been the co-operation of not 
only the students who played in it, but also 
the music instructor, the faculty and the 
school committee who helped in every way 
possible. 



24 



THE TATTLER 



Inkspots Staff 




First Row: Eva Sanderson, Edward Sincage, Clarice Graves, Donna Hobbs, Charlotte 
Brookes. 

Second Row: Miss McDermott, Louise Newell, Elizabeth Yates, Marion Sylvester. 
Roberta Clark, Phyllis Granger, Marion Warner. 

Third Row: Robert Dana, Frederic Healy, Robert Algustoski, Martha Deane, Ruth 
LaCasse, John Polwrek, John Belk. 

The students of the Junior and Senior 
classes met in November and elected the 
following students as Staff of the Inkspots. 

Editor-in-Chief . . . Clarice Graves 

Manager .... Edward Sincage 

Sports Robert Algustoski 

Artist John Belk 

Feature Editor . . . Martha Dean 

Campus Capers . . Charlotte Brooks 

Exchange Editor . . Roberta Clark 

Circulation Editor . Marion Sylvester 

Ea?h editor appointed his own assistants 
and Miss McDermott served as the faculty 
adviser. A copy of the paper was put out 
each month including sports, campus cap- 
ers, news of the Alumni in the service and 
literary material. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



25 



Tattler Staff 




First Row: Mary Lou Bisbee, Clarice Graves, Donald Harry, Robert Algustoski. 

Second Row: Miss McDermott, Donna Hobbs, Louise Newell, Marion Warner, Ruth 
Munson. 

Third Row: John Polwrek, Edward Sincage, Eva Sanderson, Martha Deane, Fred- 
eric Healy. 

Absent: Clifford Thayer. 

* * * 



Editor-in-Chief, Donald Harry '44 
Assistant Editors, Clarice Graves '44, Mary Lou Bisbee '45 
Business Manager, Frederic Healy '44 
Assistants, John Polwrek '44, Edward Sincage '44 
Alumni Editor, Donna Hobbs '44 
Exchange Editor, Marion Warner '44 
Sports Editor, Robert Algustoski '44 
Literary Editor, Eva Sanderson '45 

Joke Editor, Clifford Thayer '45 
Faculty Advisor, Louise McDermott 



36 



THE TATTLER 



National Forensic League 




First Row: Ruth Munson, Mary Lou Bisbee, Donald Harry, Louise Newell. 

Second Row: Miss Webber, Eva Sanderson, Beverly Cole, Ruth Mollison, 
Harlan Nye. 

* * * 



The members of the debating teams were 
Donald Harry, Ruth Munson, Louise Newell, 
Harlan Nye and Mary Lou Bisbee. 

Two practice debates were held in North- 
ampton in November. Five regular debates 
were held. The debaters won three and 
lost seven. 

Representatives of the League also at- 
tended two student congresses — one at 
South Hadley and the other at A. I. C. 

The students who gave declamations were 
Ruth Munson, Beverly Cole, Eva Sanderson, 
Ruth Mollison and Mary Lou Bisbee. 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



27 



Pro Merito 




First Row: Marion Sylvester, Beverly Cole, John Polwrek, Clarice Graves, Mar- 
garet Ryan. 

Second Row: Ruth Munson, Mary Lou Bisbee, Eva Sanderson, Donald Harry, Char- 
lotte Brookes. 



* * * 



The Pro Merito Society of 1944 consists of ten members: seven Seniors and three 
Seniors. The officers are: 

PRESIDENT, John Polwrek VICE-PRESIDENT, Clarice Graves 

SECRETARY, Beverly Cole 



28 



THE TATTLER 



Baseball Team 




First Row: Leeland Bates, Neil Damon, Frederic Healy, Donald Harry, Captain 
Robert Algustoski, John Polwrek, Marshall Warner. 

Second Row: Morris Healy, James McAllister, Edward Lezynski, Donald Bates, Clif- 
ford Thayer, Russell Loomis, Stewart Chapin, Manager Edward Sincage, Robert 
Lesure. 



Sixteen candidates reported for the form- 
ing of a baseball team at Williamsburg 
High for the year of '44. Burgy will have 
practically a veteran team, as only two 
players were lost through graduation last 
year. The team is playing under the name 
"Williamsburg Independents" as in bas- 
ketball, because of the lack of a coach. 
Russell Luce, who coached the Burgy team 
last year, developed the unexperienced play- 
ers into some fine first class material for 
this year's team. Although the team is 
playing under the Independent name it 
| will play school teams, such as Sanderson 
Academy, Clark School, and other teams in 
this vicinity. 

Five players will be lost through gradua- 
tion. The outlook for next year's team 
seems good, if the players keep developing 



into fine athletes as they have been doing 
right along. Williamsburg is playing inde- 
pendent ball this season, because of its late 
start and the difficulties in transportation. 
The players which will be lost through 
graduation are: Capt. Robert Algustoski, 
John Polwrek, Fred Healy, James McAllis- 
ter, and Donald Harry. 

Summary of Games played to date 
of publication 

Williamsburg 1 Carke School 4 

Williamsburg 2 Sanderson Academy 4 
Williamsburg 9 Clarke School 2 

Williamsburg Deerfield Academy 

(Junior Varsity) 14 

Williamsburg 12 Huntington High 

Williamsburg 7 Clarke School 4 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



23 



Basketball Team 




Front Row: James McAllister, Frederic Healy, Captain Robert Algustoski, John 
Polwrek, Neil Damon. 

Second Row: Edward Lezynski, Morris Healy, Marshall Warner, Manager Edward 

Sincage. 
Absent: Coach Joe Dymerski. 



Due to wartime conditions a coach was 
not available to coach a regular Burgy 
High Basketball team for '43 and '44. There- 
fore the boys formed an independent team 
under the title "Williamsburg Independ- 
ents." 

The Independents had managed to ac- 
quire Joe Dymerski as their temporary 
coach at the games, but had to have prac- 
tice sessions on their own accord. Never- 
theless they managed to play quite a few 
games and did well considering all the 
handicaps. Being an independent team the 
boys played mostly independent teams in 
their class and only managed to play two 
high school teams. The team ended the 
season with a record of six wins and six 
defeats, losing most of their games by close 
scores and winning by good margins. 

The boys who represented the team as 



outsiders were: John Golash, Alec Jabolon- 
ski, and Edward Blanchard. Of these Golash 
was the only regular playing center. The 
rest of the team was made up of high 
school boys. Four varsity players will be 
lost through graduation. They are Healy, 
Polwrek, Toski and McAllister. 



Independents 17 

Independents 31 

Independents 23 

Independents 18 

Independents 32 

Independents 16 

Independents 40 

Independents 33 

Independents 19 

Independents 28 

Independents 28 

Independents 38 



St. Catherine 11 
St. Catherine 29 
Clark Reserves 21 
Huntington High 39 
Easthampton All Stars 33 
Sanderson Academy 32 
Easthampton All-Stars 18 
Florence Midway 20 
Sanderson Academy 21 
Cummington 32 
Prophylactic Brush Co. 31 
Prophylactic Brush Co. 17 



30 



THE TATTLER 



Alumni 

ALUMNI OFFICERS 
President ...... Norman Graves 

Vice-President Lewis Black 

Secretary Evelyn R. Kmit 

Treasurer June Bowker 



"THE HEROES" 
Dedicated to Gerald Larkin 

What hope must lie so deep within 

The hidden tui-bulent soul. 

Naught else to reward the spark of truth 

After death has reached her goal. 

What cherished dreams, dear love of life 
That's strewn like a rotten mold 
And bears the sorrowing human kind 
That's forced away from the "fold". 

Need not I look to the bloody fields 
And the tombs of forgotten men, 
To know that once they too knew life 
And the hope of living again. 

Their destinies shaped on a fairer day 
When they dreamed and lived as men. 
What thwarting, piercing agony 
They knew with their great "Amen". 

BOB TOSKI '44. 



ALUMNI IN SERVICE 

WAVES 
Marine Corps 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 



1937 — Annetta Barrus 
Lawrence Corbett 
Edward Fontaine 
William Howe 
Winifred Packard 
Wendell Pittsinger 
Vernon West 

1938— Ruth Black 
Roberta Colburn 



Navy Nurse 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 

WAVES 
WAVES 



Notes 

Richard Ames 
Robert Bradby 
Thomas Coogan 
Douglas Fairbanks 

1939— Richard Bates 
Carleton Field 
Adam Golash 
Elizabeth Penn 
Francis Soltys 
Raymond Stone 
James Stone 
George Warner Jr. 
Phyllis West 

1940— Horace Bartlett 
Myla Campbell 
Raymond Johndrow 
Francis Malloy 
Bernard Murphy 
Ashton Rustermeyer 
William Ryan 
Bernard Sampson 
Winthrop Stone 
Henry Wilson 

1941 — Edward Ames 
Ralph Bates 
Russell Bisbee 
Leo Dymerski 
Wellington Graves 
Harold Hillenbrand 
Frederick King 
Henry Kopka 
Robert McAllister 
Lucius Merritt 
Robert Newell 
Albert Roberge 

1942 — John Barrus 
Michael Batura 
Robert Edwards 
Edward Golash 
John Pavelcsyk 
Harry Warner 
David West 



U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 
Marine Corps 
U. S. Army 

U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 
WAC 
U. S. Army 
Army Air Corps 
Army Air Corps 
Army Air Corps 
WAVES 

U. S. Army 
Marines 

U. S. Navy 
Army Air Corps 

U. S. Navy 
Army Air Corps 

U. S. Navy 
U. S.Navy 

U. S. Army 
Army Air Corps 

U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 
U. S. Army 

Navy Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 

Army Air Corps 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Navy 
U. S. Army 



31 



CLASS OF 1943 

William Bisbee — Stockbridge 

Mary Bowker — Westover Field 

Donald Campbell — Army Air Corps 

Helen Carver — Working at State Hospital 

June Colburn — Mass. State 

Jean Crone — Mass. State 

Marion Culver — High School Office 

Elizabeth Damon — Bates College 

Carolyn Emerson — Northampton Commer- 
cial College 

Frostine Graves — Bridgewater Teachers 
College 

Geneva Graves — Colby Junior College 

Joseph Haigh — U. S. Navy 

Elizabeth Harlow — Cooley Dickinson 

Millard Hathaway — U. S. Navy 

Roger King — Brass Shop 

Shirley Knight — Cooley Dickinson 

Irene Metz — Cooley Dickinson 

Frank Munson — Army Air Corps 

Robert Munson — U. S. Army 

Lorena Nietsche — Grant Paper Company 

John O'Brien— U. S. Navy 

Charlotte Otis — Cooley Dickinson 

Arlene Sabo — Cooley Dickinson 



Edna Shaw — Working at State Hospital 
Lester Shaw — U. S. Army 
Mildred Shaw — Cooley Dickinson 
Norma Wells — Northampton Commercial 
Donald Wickland — Prophylactic 



ALUMNI DEATHS 
Victoria Michaloski Murphy '42 
Gerald Larkin '41 

ALUMNI BIRTHS 



Jerry Black Harding '33 Daughter 

Betty Buford Rogers '40 Son 

Norman Graves '34 Son 

Lois Bisbee Gillman '32 Son 



ALUMNI MARRIAGES 
Shirley Rhoades '40 to Albert Meisse 
Shirley Campbell '40 to Louis Hathaway 
Sylvia Clary '42 to Julius Sofinowski 
Statia Golash '39 to Joseph Gulash 
Raymond Johndrow '40 to Doris Henderson 
Jane Bickford '39 to Lawrence Montgomery 



ALUMNI GRADUATES 
William Bisbee '43 Stockbridge 



Jokes 



Mother (on train) — If you're not a good 
boy, I'll slap you. 

Bob Smart— You do, and I'll tell the 
conductor how old I really am. 

* * * 

The hope of the family returned from 
his first day's work at a munitions factory 
with fingers bandaged. 

"Oh, Bert," said hi% father, "how's this?" 

'Well," said the bright one, "the foreman 
said the machine was foolproof, but I soon 
showed him." 

* * * 

Mr. Foster: What animal is noted for his 
fur? 

N. Bates: The skunk; the more fur you 
gets away from him the better it is fur you. 



"My boy friend is getting along swell in 
the Army," said Clarice Graves. "He hit a 
sergeant the other day and they've made 
him a court martial." 

$ 3fC $ 

Visitor: "How many students are there 
in your class?" 

Teacher: "About one in every five." 

$ 3|t 4 

"Fifteen minutes after putting on a pair 
of your golf socks, I made a hole in one," 
wrote Bob Toski to the sock manufacturer. 

# * * 

Mr. Foster: "What is the greatest con- 
tribution which science has made to Amer- 
ica?" 

Mert Nye: "Peroxide blondes." 



32 THE TATTLER 



Autographs 



Compliments of 



Packard s Soda Shoppe 

Opposite Town Hall 



SCHOOL SUPPLIES, MAGAZINES, GREETING CARDS 

Patent Medicines 

OUR OWN ICE CREAM FOUNTAIN AND BOOTH SERVICE 



BEST WISHES 


Village Hill Nursery 


to the 






ALPINES, PERENNIALS 


CLASS OF '44 






ANNUAL PLANTS 


Conen Bros. 


and HERBS 


NORTHAMPTON 


Williamsburg 


Hill Brothers 


H. Q. Stanton 


SLIPS NIGHTGOWNS 


General Merchandise 


SOCKS PAJAMAS 


WEST CHESTERFIELD 


Main Street Northampton 


Telephone 2523 



Compliments of 

Frank Crone - and - Purina Mills 





Open Evenings by Appointment 


Compliments of 


Sliultz Beauty Shop 


Candle Light Den 


FOR THOSE WHO WANT THE BEST 
AND THE MOST FOR THEIR MONEY 


vjosnen rtoau tviuiainbuui^; 


9YK Main Strppt TTn Onp Flip-ht 
Telephone 567 




ALL KINDS OF ROUGH AND 


Compliments of 


FINISHED LUMBER 


First National 


PURE MAPLE SYRUP 
FANCY CAKE SUGAR 


btore 


and SOFT SUGAR 


Packard Brothers 


WILLIAMSBURG 


GOSHEN 

Telephone 4633 Williamsburg R.F.D 


Williamsburg Qara^e 




C. K. HATHAWAY 


Socony Service Station 


Telephone 4351 




bEKYlCE blAliON 


Dial 275 


Ice Cream, Candy, Cigars 


WILLIAMSBURG 


WILLIAMSBURG 





STATIONERY 
Williamsburg 



C. F. JENKINS 



— GREETING CARDS — 
ICE CREAM 



MEDICINES 
Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



The 

The Haydenville Savings Bank 



CHARLES A. BISBEE HOMER R. BISBEE 

Telephone Chesterfield 2143 Telephone Chesterfield 2141 

BISBEE BROTHERS 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 
GRAIN, FEED, FERTILIZERS, SALT, CEMENT, AND AGRICULTURE TOOLS 

Bird & Sons Roofiing Paper Engines and Separators 

International Harvester Co. McCormick Line Harvesting Machinery 

Building Material High Grade Grass Seed 

Oliver Plows and Cultivators 

Norfolk Paint 

Get Our Prices on Anything You Need 
Before Ordering Elsewhere 
STOREHOUSES AT WILLIAMSBURG AND CHESTERFIELD 
Telephone Williamsburg 271 Williamsburg, Mass., R.F.D. 1 



Compliments of 

CLASS OF '42 



Compliments of 

The Haydenville Company 



Thorough business training was never so essential for so many people 

Northampton Commercial College 
John C. Pickett, Principal 
" The School of Thoroughness" 



Wm. Baker & Son 


LaFleur Bros. 


GENERAL MERCHANDISE 


"The PAINT People" 


Service — Courtesy — Satisfaction 


PAINTS -- WALLPAPER 


Telephone 2341 Chesterfield 


45 King Street Tel. 374-M 



HOFFMAN STUDIO 



PHOTOGRAPHERS 



52 Center Street 



Telephone 2068 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES 



! T. A. Pursedove Co. 



15 State Street 



GOOD THINGS TO EAT 
AT 



Bed 



arm s 



NORTHAMPTON 



Candy Mailed 
Refreshing Sodas 



Tasty Pastries 
Fine Ice Cream 



Compliments of 

Harlow & Fennesse^ 

OFFICE SUPPLIES 
AND STATIONERY 

Wholesale and Retail Newsdealer 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

PAINTS AND WALL PAPER 
Pierce s Paint Store 



Telephone 1207 



196 Main Street 



Northampton 



! 



Manlian Potato Chip Co. 
Inc. 

NORMA LEE CANDIES 
92 King Street 



i 



Telephone 772 



Northampton 



Compliments of 



! Florence Savins 



Florence 



Mass. 



\( A oodwortk 
Beauty Salon 

O. J. Bonneau, Prop. 



200 Main St. 



Phone 2390 



Northampton, Mass. 




Have us make your 
watch Dependable 



73T 




Inaccurate time means 
missed trains, appoint- 
ments, sometimes a disaster. 

Dearing s 
JEWELERS 
Northampton Easthampton 



Breguet s Service Station j 



MOBILGAS 



MOBILOIL 



MOBILUBRICATION 



Florence, Mass. 



Franklin King, Jr. 

See This Office About the New 
Low Cost Theft and Robbery 

INSURANCE 



277 Main Street 



Northampton 



YOU MAY ALWAYS DEPEND UPON THE QUALITY 
OF FLOWERS WHICH COME FROM 



Compliments of 

Grant Paper Products, Inc. 

LEEDS, MASS. 



When IN NEED of 


Brooks Garage 


CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, 


SHOES 


COLONIAL ESSO DEALER 


For Men and Boys 




Try 


GAS — OIL — ACCESSORIES 


Lon^tin's Florence Store 


ELECTRIC WELDING 


90 Maple St. Florence 


Route 9 Berkshire Trail 


Telephone 828-W 


GOSHEN, MASS. 


Service — Quality — Satisfaction 


J. F. McAllister 




Compliments of 


ESSO SERVICENTER 




Gasoline Motor Oil 


C. O. CARLSON 


Tires, Batteries and Accessories 


GOSHEN, MASS. 


ROUTE 9 HAYDENVILLE 





Hardware, Sporting Goods, 


Compliments of 


Fishing Tackle, Baseball, Tennis 
and Camping Items 


J. K. xHansheld G? bon 


Foster-Farrar Co. 


FUNERAL HOME 


162 Main Street 


South Main Street 


L I i (l ! I 1 ( 1 ^ ' 1 : . , l>ldS»o. 


Haydenville, Mass. 




Herman A. Cohn Phone 1426 




Trie Fair Store 


Compliments of 


WOMEN'S, MEN'S 

and 

CHLDREN'S WEAR 
SHOES 


Moriart^ Bros. 


27-29 Pleasant Street, Northampton 


FURNITURE 


National Shoe Repairing 

John Mateja, Prop. 


Northampton 


15 Masonic Street Tel. 826-W 
Northampton, Mass. 



ELY FUNERAL HOME 

CHARLES E. ELY 

Telephone 1292-W Northampton 

LADY ASSISTANT 



Compliments of 

E. J. Gusetti 

Haydenville 



Compliments of 

Wm. J. Skeekan & Co. 

Haydenville 



Compliments of 

F. N. Graves & Son 

WILLIAMSBURG 



Compliments of 

Tke Clar\? Farm 

TRY 

OUR MAPLE SYRUP 

For Farm and Village Property 
Consult Silas Snow 
Telephone 3563 Williamsburg 



A. Soltys 

MEATS GROCERIES 
VEGETABLES 

Telephone 223 Haydenville 



Compliments of 

R. F. Burke 

WILLIAMSBURG . 



Ckas. A. Bowker 

HARDWARE PAINT 
and 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Telephone 245 Williamsburg 



Compliments of 

Jokn H. Grakam Estate 
COAL — OIL — ICE 

WILLIAMSBURG 



* 1 1 

E. J. O Donnell 


Gannon & Forsancler 


POULTRY and DAIRY FEEDS 


FLORENCE 


MASON SUPPLIES 


Depot Avenue Telephone 819 


Hay, Straw and Peat Moss, Seeds 




Phone 414 29 No. Maple Street 


EASTHAMPTON 


r i . ' i v i . . ^ 1 i . 


47 Cottage Street Telephone 660 


Jones The Florist 


E. J. Gare & Son 


BULBS PERENNIALS 




CUT FLOWERS 


JEWELRY 


Floral Designs 


SILVERWARE 


• 

Telephone 4331 Haydenville 


112 Main St. Northampton 



Compliments of 

Northampton Street Railway Co. 



LOUIS D. PELLISSIER, 

General Manager 



O. T. DEWHURST 



OPTOMETRISTS AND OPTICIANS 



Our modern school systems put a lot of work upon growing eyes 
which puts a strain upon those with defective vision. Latent defects 
in the eyes of children should be carefully looked after. A little 
fore-sight now may keep them from wearing glasses later and will 
help them in their studies. Let us examine their eyes. 



201 MAIN STREET 



Telephone 184-W 



NORTHAMPTON 



For the young man who grad- 
uates this year we have every- 
thing that he will need for this 
important oc?asion. 

Merritt Clark & Co. 

NORTHAMPTON 



The E. & J. Ci^ar Co. 



WHOLESALE 



TOBACCONISTS 



23 Main Street 



Northampton 



SMART WEARING APPAREL 
FOR YOUNG MEN 

At Moderate Prices 
Harr^ Daniel Associates 

Northampton 



Trembla^ Dru| Co. 

THE REXALL STORE 

M. L. Sender, Ph.G., Reg. M., Prop. 

SAME SERVICE AS ALWAYS 

Pay Gas, Electric, and 
Telephone Bills Here 

Telephone 2300 131 Main Street 

FLORENCE 



Compliments of 

Herlilr^s 
DRY GOODS STORE 



76 Maple Street 



Florence 



Francis L. LaMonta^ne 



PAINTER & DECORATOR 



Telephone 467-W 12 No. Maple St. 



FLORENCE 



Chilson s Shops 

W. LEROY CHILSON 

AWNINGS VENETIAN BLINDS 

FURNITURE COVERINGS AND UPHOLSTERING SUPPLIES 

Furniture Upholstering Automobile Plate and Safety Glass 

Harness Shop Auto Tops and Upholstery 

Slip Covers, Cushions Truck Covers and Canvas Goods 

34 CENTER STREET, NORTHAMPTON 



Ward Miller 

The Westinghouse Store 

OIL BURNERS and SERVICE 
Home Insulation 

14 Center Street Phone 2123-R 

Northampton Massachusetts 

Harlow's 

LUGGAGE REPAIRS 

Bill Folds Keytainers 
Expert Locksmith 

24 Center Street Telephone 155-W 
Northampton 



GOOD SHOES 
Reasonably Priced 
Correctly Fitted 

David Boot Shop 

221 Main Street 
Northampton Mass. 



ARTS 
AND 
CRAFTS 
Home Industries 

Handicraft Shop 

18 Center Street Northampton 



Newell Funeral Home 
R. D. NEWELL & SON 
74 KING STREET NORTHAMPTON 



Compliments of 

R. A. MacLeod Nursery 
LANDSCAPING AND TREE SERVICE 
TELEPHONE 211 OLD GOSHEN ROAD 



Compliments of 

CLASS OF '45 



Compliments of A Friend 



Hillcrest Farm 


WAR BONDS 


Mrs. Clayton Rhoades 


AND 


SINGLE COMB 


STAMPS 


RHODE ISLAND REDS 


WILLIAMSBURG POST 


Bred to Win, Lay and Pay 


OFFICE 


WILLIAMSBURG 





W. E. LondergSan 




PRINTING 


Compliments of 


30 Crafts Avenue Northampton 


A FRIEND 


Telephone 1740 




HENRY A. 


BIDWELL 


INSURANCE 


REAL ESTATE 


OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 


Bidwell Travel Service 


Tours — Hotel Reservations 


NONTUCK SAVINGS BANK BUILDING 


78 Main Street 


Northampton 


Office Phone 351 


Res. Phone 348 



Compliments of A Friend 



RUBY'S 

Northampton's Largest Furniture Store 
15 Bridge St. Phone 3519 Northampton